23.2.09

Why I am proud to be an only child

When you're an only child, you become used to the "you're such an only child" comments.  

I hate these comments; mainly because when pressed on them, most people can't explain what they actually mean. Are you saying I'm more selfish than you because I didn't have a brother or sister? Are you implying that I am more emotionally needy? 

Let me make this clear: either one of those assumptions is complete, unfiltered bullshit. 

As far as I can tell, the only major repercussion of my growing up as an only child is that I don't need to be constantly entertained or comforted by the presence of other people. Don't get me wrong: I love people. But, because I spent a lot of time alone when I was growing up, being alone just doesn't bother me like it does some people. 

Recently I read an excellent article at BCC News entitled Population: The elephant in the room.

I love this article because of its candor. The hard, naked truth is that in the future everyone needs to have less children. Humanity has probably already overshot Earth's carrying capacity; and unless we decrease the surplus population, the environment will never recover. 

It is my hope that in the near future, having more than two children (i.e. replacement rate for a couple) will come to be seen as a civically, socially, and environmentally irresponsible decision. Maybe then the ludicrous stigma against only children will be erased once and for all. 

3 comments:

carterblanton said...

IMO, I think the stigma of being an only child is that of a person who has had less experience compromising. It's someone who has not had to deal with getting kicked out of the front seat or losing out on the last ice cream sandwich or the first intertube ride.. As small as those circumstances may seem there is possibly something to say for not encountering them as an only child. It might not be as evident as blindly saying that only children are used to always getting what they want, but I'd argue it is more because it was never challenged instead of an issue with selfishness.

For example, when traveling in a foreign country - say someone wants to sit on a hill and take pictures of a sunset while a certain other person would like to go experience nightlife. If the photographer of the group is an only child, he/she may not initially suggest a compromise, but rather be more apt to "do his/her own thing" to the dismay of those raised in and around a group mentality. In effort to maintain a familial bonding experience the group members raised with siblings are more likely to agree to climb a mountain in Barcelona to take pictures of the sunset...and return to town too tired to do anything but collapse in bed.

Capt. Austin Maness said...

Is this about Jesse? lol

carterblanton said...

I didnt want to name names...and I guess I didn't have to!